Friday, April 12, 2013

Kojak


A -  Twenty-Six TV Shows - Z
Kojak is an American television series starring Telly Savalas as the title character, bald New York City Police Department DetectiveLieutenant Theo Kojak. It aired from October 24, 1973, to March 18, 1978, on CBS. It took the time slot of the popular Cannon series, which was moved one hour earlier. Kojak's Greek American heritage, shared by actor Savalas, was prominently featured in the series.
In 1999 TV Guide ranked Theo Kojak number 18 on its 50 Greatest TV Characters of All Time list.
The series was set in the New York City Police Department's Eleventh Precinct (the building shown was actually Ninth Precinct), Manhattan South Patrol Borough. The show revolved around the efforts of the tough and incorruptible Lieutenant Theodore ("Theo") Kojak (Telly Savalas), a balddapperNew York City policeman, who was fond of Tootsie Roll Pops and using the catchphrase, "Who loves ya, baby?" Kojak was stubborn and tenacious in his investigation of crimes—and also displayed a dark, cynical wit, along with a tendency to bend the rules if it brought a criminal to justice. Savalas described Kojak as a "basically honest character, tough but with feelings—the kind of guy who might kick a hooker in the tail if he had to, but they'd understand each other because maybe they grew up on the same kind of block.


4 comments:

YVONNE LEWIS: said...

How we all sat around to watch kojak,a real good programme to watch.
Loved the theme tune also.

Yvonne.

Arlee Bird said...

I'm probably starting to sound like a broken record, but I haven't seen many episodes and never really got into it that much. I did like his character though.

Lee
An A to Z Co-Host
Tossing It Out
Twitter: @AprilA2Z

LD Masterson said...

I remember watching this but I always had trouble getting past the image of Terry Savalas as Maggott in The Dirty Dozen. It was too hard to see him as one of the good guys.

Eddie Eddings said...

Telly played Pontius Pilate in The Greatest Story Ever Told with a New York accent.